The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

A spokeswoman for the Alberta Human Rights Commission said the chief commissioner will examine adjudicator Moosa Jiwaji’s Twitter remarks after the organization received a complaint this week. An Alberta human rights adjudicator, facing criticism for ruling in favour of a Czech immigrant who claimed discrimination after failing his Canadian engineering qualification exams, is now under scrutiny for his social media comments on East African politics. (via National Post)
In September, in the wake of the Westgate mall attack in Nairobi, Kenya, in which Al-Shabaab terrorists killed at least 67 people, Mr. Jiwaji seemed to attribute the violence to immigration.
“Go into eastleigh [a Nairobi suburb] and get rid of all those individuals whoa re [sic] living in Kenya on fake papers. Do DNA test on all of them,” he tweeted.
On Nov. 29, he wrote: “Kenya in reverse gear. Another 50 years I guess. I will be dead by then. Good luck. A Constitution means DICK!!”
The Twitter account was deleted shortly after Mr. Jiwaji was criticized by host Ezra Levant on his Sun News Network show.

A spokeswoman for the Alberta Human Rights Commission said the chief commissioner will examine adjudicator Moosa Jiwaji’s Twitter remarks after the organization received a complaint this week.
An Alberta human rights adjudicator, facing criticism for ruling in favour of a Czech immigrant who claimed discrimination after failing his Canadian engineering qualification exams, is now under scrutiny for his social media comments on East African politics. (via National Post)

  • In September, in the wake of the Westgate mall attack in Nairobi, Kenya, in which Al-Shabaab terrorists killed at least 67 people, Mr. Jiwaji seemed to attribute the violence to immigration.
  • “Go into eastleigh [a Nairobi suburb] and get rid of all those individuals whoa re [sic] living in Kenya on fake papers. Do DNA test on all of them,” he tweeted.
  • On Nov. 29, he wrote: “Kenya in reverse gear. Another 50 years I guess. I will be dead by then. Good luck. A Constitution means DICK!!”
  • The Twitter account was deleted shortly after Mr. Jiwaji was criticized by host Ezra Levant on his Sun News Network show.

Easter’n Eastern’rope

fyeaheasterneurope:

Romanians Revel in Rich Easter Traditions

Orthodox believers in Romania are gearing up to celebrate Easter with their usual fervour on April 15, drawing on a rich variety of Easter traditions that Romanians have preserved.

The celebrations started with Holy Week, usually held a week later than Catholic Holy week. Despite the different date, it also begins with Palm Sunday (Florii, in Romanian), when Jesus entered Jerusalem and ends on Easter Sunday, marking Christ’s resurrection.

While most Christians observe these festivals, Romanians do things their own way. On Good Thursday, people take food and drink to church and boiled eggs are painted.

Tradition says that if the eggs turn red this day, they will keep from spoiling all year. The favoured colour for Easter eggs is, therefore red, but other colours like green, yellow or blue, are also used.

In some parts of Romania, mainly in Bukovina, in the north, there is a tradition of colouring eggs, using different geometrical and floral motifs. The process involves various paints and wax. The egg painting ritual still survives, but only a few people still know this art.

The tradition on Good Friday is to place flowers in church for Christ and to pass under a table three times, signifying the pains that Christ endured when he carried his cross to his hill of crucifixion at Golgotha.

On the night between Holy Saturday and Easter [Passion] Sunday, people go to church to celebrate the resurrection by attending midnight mass, where they light candles. They take the lighted candles home to keep the holy spirit alight in their homes, souls and lives.

At home, they eat certain Easter dishes, which include “Pasca”, a traditional Easter cake, a sweet bread called “Cozonac”, which is a slightly sweet yeast-raised egg bread, lamb soup and lamb steak. They also eat haggis, a traditional Easter dish made from the organs of a lamb, and, of course the painted eggs.

The coloured Easter eggs can be eaten now, as they are boiled, but only after the tradition of tapping the eggs between two people. This involves making a saying with religious connotations. The first person says, “Christ has risen” [“Hristos a inviat”], while the second responds, “He is risen indeed” - in Romanian, “Adevarat a inviat”.

On Easter Sunday morning, people usually go to church for the Easter morning mass. This mass is not as well attended as the midnight mass. After that, they go back home and eat the blessed food, which they have taken with them to the church.

There are many other local Easter traditions. In Bukovina, on the night of Easter, there is the custom of fire vigils. Fires are lit on hills and burn all night. In Transylvania, young girls are sprayed with perfume by boys dressed in traditional clothes on Easter Monday. This way, the girls will have good luck all year.

If Romanian cozonak is anything like Bulgarian kozunak (which is also eaten at Easter), it is one of MY FAVORITE THINGS EVER. Nom nom nom so delicious.

I believe they also do the perfume spraying in Hungary.

The best tradition is in Czech R & Slovakia, where men lovingly whip women’s bum with a special whip (cf wikipedia):

In the Czech Republic andSlovakia, a tradition of spanking or whipping is carried out onEaster Monday. In the morning, men spank women with a special handmade whip called a pomlázka (in Czech) or korbáč (in Slovak), or, in eastern Moravia and Slovakia, throw cold water on them. The pomlázka/korbáč consists of eight, twelve or even twenty-four withies (willow rods), is usually from half a meter to two meters long and decorated with coloured ribbons at the end. The spanking is not painful or intended to cause suffering. A legend says that women should be spanked with a whip in order to keep their health and beauty during the whole next year.

An additional purpose can be for men to exhibit their attraction to women; unvisited women can even feel offended. Traditionally, the spanked woman gives a coloured egg and sometimes a small amount of money to the man as a sign of her thanks. In some regions, the women can get revenge in the afternoon or the following day when they can pour a bucket of cold water on any man. The habit slightly varies across Slovakia and the Czech Republic. A similar tradition existed in Poland (where it is called Dyngus Day), but it is now little more than an all-day water fight.

Now you know why Czech and Slovak women are so sexy.. :)

Czech Railways recently rolled out a new feature that has raised more than a few eyebrows — “Ladies Compartments.” These designated six-seater areas, introduced at the start of the year, are part of a marketing strategy intended to improve service for women who want special assistance or priority seating. But the move was immediately criticized as being discriminatory against male passengers.
Petr Stahlavsky, spokesman for the rail operator Ceske drahy, defended the changes.
“I would like to point out that these compartments are not designated only for women,” he said. “Men can use them as well, but women have priority.” In other words, if female passengers don’t mind sharing their space with a man, he can stay. If not, they can ask him to leave or seek out a ticket controller for assistance.“It is to provide sufficient comfort to women,” Mr. Stahlavsky said. “This is based on Western European and Christian traditions where women have priority in taking seats. This is not any discrimination but social and cultural tradition.”
At the moment, only about 30 trains have “Ladies Compartments,” mostly servicing overnight or early-morning routes between Prague and cities in Germany, Slovakia and Austria. But that number could increase to 80 by the summer if there is enough demand. Ceske drahy said it had received a number of requests for such compartments.
The idea was modeled after the Austrian rail network, which has been providing “ladies-only compartments” on its trains for more than a decade.
(via Prague Railways Introduces Ladies-First Compartments - NYTimes.com)
I reblogged a photo of train travel in Ukraine not long ago. Big difference, eh? :)
What’s interesting here is that chivalry is presented as an “European tradition.”

Czech Railways recently rolled out a new feature that has raised more than a few eyebrows — “Ladies Compartments.” These designated six-seater areas, introduced at the start of the year, are part of a marketing strategy intended to improve service for women who want special assistance or priority seating. But the move was immediately criticized as being discriminatory against male passengers.

Petr Stahlavsky, spokesman for the rail operator Ceske drahy, defended the changes.

“I would like to point out that these compartments are not designated only for women,” he said. “Men can use them as well, but women have priority.” In other words, if female passengers don’t mind sharing their space with a man, he can stay. If not, they can ask him to leave or seek out a ticket controller for assistance.

“It is to provide sufficient comfort to women,” Mr. Stahlavsky said. “This is based on Western European and Christian traditions where women have priority in taking seats. This is not any discrimination but social and cultural tradition.”

At the moment, only about 30 trains have “Ladies Compartments,” mostly servicing overnight or early-morning routes between Prague and cities in Germany, Slovakia and Austria. But that number could increase to 80 by the summer if there is enough demand. Ceske drahy said it had received a number of requests for such compartments.

The idea was modeled after the Austrian rail network, which has been providing “ladies-only compartments” on its trains for more than a decade.

(via Prague Railways Introduces Ladies-First Compartments - NYTimes.com)

I reblogged a photo of train travel in Ukraine not long ago. Big difference, eh? :)

What’s interesting here is that chivalry is presented as an “European tradition.”