The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

Nineteenth-century retailer John Wanamaker is responsible for perhaps the most repeated line in marketing: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, the trouble is I don’t know which half.” Today, marketers are grappling with the Wanamaker Paradox: The more we learn which half of advertising is working, the more we realize we’re wasting way more than half. Perhaps you’re nodding your head about now. Most people you know don’t click online ads. At least, not on purpose. But now research is getting closer to quantifying exactly how few people click on Internet ads and exactly how ineffective they are. It’s not a pretty picture. (via A Dangerous Question: Does Internet Advertising Work at All? - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic)

Nineteenth-century retailer John Wanamaker is responsible for perhaps the most repeated line in marketing: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted, the trouble is I don’t know which half.” Today, marketers are grappling with the Wanamaker Paradox: The more we learn which half of advertising is working, the more we realize we’re wasting way more than half. Perhaps you’re nodding your head about now. Most people you know don’t click online ads. At least, not on purpose. But now research is getting closer to quantifying exactly how few people click on Internet ads and exactly how ineffective they are. It’s not a pretty picture. (via A Dangerous Question: Does Internet Advertising Work at All? - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic)

Marc Andrews wrote Hidden Persuasion to highlight the various methods advertisers use to lure us in. (via WIRED)
ANTHOPOMORPHISM.
TRUSTWORTHINESS.
SOCIAL PROOF.
SCARCITY.
ACKNOWLEDGING RESISTANCE.
some of these are logical fallacies :)

Marc Andrews wrote Hidden Persuasion to highlight the various methods advertisers use to lure us in. (via WIRED)

  • ANTHOPOMORPHISM.
  • TRUSTWORTHINESS.
  • SOCIAL PROOF.
  • SCARCITY.
  • ACKNOWLEDGING RESISTANCE.

some of these are logical fallacies :)

For networks, it’s a chance to milk more eyeballs and advertising dollars. If you’ve been following Mad Men you know that the truth is the first casualty in advertising. So instead of calling it an extra short season, networks now say it’s a “split season.” “Why break it in half?” Stephen Colbert pointedly asked Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner on The Colbert Report . Weiner said it was simply about ratings. AMC did the same thing with Bad Breaking Bad and it built the show in “a huge way,” he told Colbert. (via Toronto Star)

Maybe we should all follow the lead of Breaking Bad fan Noam Lazebnik, who sued Apple’s iTunes for what he says is essentially charging extra for the series finale. He expected to get all 16 episodes when he paid up, but Apple sold the final eight episodes as a separate season.
If the networks are already saying it’s one season, it’s a ripoff to pay twice, Lazebnik alleged. Apple promptly capitulated with refunds.
Lazebnik is on to something. We should put a stop to this split season madness before it gets any worse. So here’s one way to send a message: fans should start a class-action suit against Matthew Weiner for false advertising. Sign me up now before I forget what happened in the mid-season finale last Sunday.

For networks, it’s a chance to milk more eyeballs and advertising dollars.
If you’ve been following Mad Men you know that the truth is the first casualty in advertising. So instead of calling it an extra short season, networks now say it’s a “split season.”
“Why break it in half?” Stephen Colbert pointedly asked Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner on The Colbert Report .
Weiner said it was simply about ratings. AMC did the same thing with Bad Breaking Bad and it built the show in “a huge way,” he told Colbert. (via Toronto Star)

  • Maybe we should all follow the lead of Breaking Bad fan Noam Lazebnik, who sued Apple’s iTunes for what he says is essentially charging extra for the series finale. He expected to get all 16 episodes when he paid up, but Apple sold the final eight episodes as a separate season.
  • If the networks are already saying it’s one season, it’s a ripoff to pay twice, Lazebnik alleged. Apple promptly capitulated with refunds.
  • Lazebnik is on to something. We should put a stop to this split season madness before it gets any worse. So here’s one way to send a message: fans should start a class-action suit against Matthew Weiner for false advertising. Sign me up now before I forget what happened in the mid-season finale last Sunday.