The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

Vigilant Solutions, founded in 2009, claims to have the nation’s largest repository of license-plate images with nearly 2 billion records stored in its National Vehicle Location Service (NVLS). Despite the enormous implications of the database for the public, any law enforcement agency that signs up for the service is sworn to a vow of silence by the company’s terms of service. Vigilant is clear about the reason for the secrecy: it’s to prevent customers from “cooperating” with media and calling attention to its database. That database is used by law enforcement and others to track stolen cars or vehicles used in crimes, as well as to locate illegal immigrants, kidnapping victims and others — though the vast majority of license plates stored belong to ordinary drivers who aren’t suspected of a crime. (via Cops Must Swear Silence to Access Vehicle Tracking System | Threat Level | WIRED)
The agreement law enforcement signs, which was uncovered by the EFF, reads in part:

You shall not create, publish, distribute, or permit any written, electronically transmitted or other form of publicity material that makes reference to LEARN or this Agreement without first submitting the material to LEARN-NVLS and receiving written consent from LEARN-NVLS. This prohibition is specifically intended to prohibit users from cooperating with any media outlet to bring attention to LEARN or LEARN-NVLS. Breach this provision may result in LEARN-NVLS immediately termination of this Agreement upon notice to you [sic].

LEARN stands for Law Enforcement Archival and Reporting Network and is Vigilant’s online portal where license plate data and images are aggregated and analyzed for law enforcement to access.
“LEARN provides agencies with an easy way to manage users and vehicle hotlists, query historical license plate reader (LPR) data and used [sic] advanced analytics for enhanced investigations,” thecompany’s web site says.

Vigilant Solutions, founded in 2009, claims to have the nation’s largest repository of license-plate images with nearly 2 billion records stored in its National Vehicle Location Service (NVLS). Despite the enormous implications of the database for the public, any law enforcement agency that signs up for the service is sworn to a vow of silence by the company’s terms of service. Vigilant is clear about the reason for the secrecy: it’s to prevent customers from “cooperating” with media and calling attention to its database. That database is used by law enforcement and others to track stolen cars or vehicles used in crimes, as well as to locate illegal immigrants, kidnapping victims and others — though the vast majority of license plates stored belong to ordinary drivers who aren’t suspected of a crime. (via Cops Must Swear Silence to Access Vehicle Tracking System | Threat Level | WIRED)

The agreement law enforcement signs, which was uncovered by the EFF, reads in part:

You shall not create, publish, distribute, or permit any written, electronically transmitted or other form of publicity material that makes reference to LEARN or this Agreement without first submitting the material to LEARN-NVLS and receiving written consent from LEARN-NVLS. This prohibition is specifically intended to prohibit users from cooperating with any media outlet to bring attention to LEARN or LEARN-NVLS. Breach this provision may result in LEARN-NVLS immediately termination of this Agreement upon notice to you [sic].

LEARN stands for Law Enforcement Archival and Reporting Network and is Vigilant’s online portal where license plate data and images are aggregated and analyzed for law enforcement to access.

“LEARN provides agencies with an easy way to manage users and vehicle hotlists, query historical license plate reader (LPR) data and used [sic] advanced analytics for enhanced investigations,” thecompany’s web site says.

City councillors are under no obligation to reveal their records of meetings, schedules, emails and the like to the public because, unlike bureaucrats, they’re not considered public “employees” under Ontario’s laws. (via Freedom of information activists ask: Why are Toronto councillors allowed to work in secret? | Toronto Star)

Unlike the mayor and thousands of city employees, councillors are not subject to freedom of information legislation because they are not deemed municipal employees — their records are considered personal.
It’s a loophole that a leading accountability watchdog says is “dangerously undemocratic.”
Even Ontario’s assistant privacy commissioner has concerns.
Good work by Toronto Star - Kudos, Robyn Doolittle!

City councillors are under no obligation to reveal their records of meetings, schedules, emails and the like to the public because, unlike bureaucrats, they’re not considered public “employees” under Ontario’s laws. (via Freedom of information activists ask: Why are Toronto councillors allowed to work in secret? | Toronto Star)

  • Unlike the mayor and thousands of city employees, councillors are not subject to freedom of information legislation because they are not deemed municipal employees — their records are considered personal.
  • It’s a loophole that a leading accountability watchdog says is “dangerously undemocratic.”
  • Even Ontario’s assistant privacy commissioner has concerns.
Good work by Toronto Star - Kudos, Robyn Doolittle!
govtoversight:

A powerful quote from Jerry Ensminger, a retired Marine Corps drill instructor, from the 9th Annual Ridenhour Awards yesterday. Read more at the POGO blog.

Camp Lejeune coverup hit the military more than civilians :(

govtoversight:

A powerful quote from Jerry Ensminger, a retired Marine Corps drill instructor, from the 9th Annual Ridenhour Awards yesterday. Read more at the POGO blog.

Camp Lejeune coverup hit the military more than civilians :(