The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

getting ready to say goodbye to Windows 10 - switching hard drives to the one with Windows 7; neither can use the full 4GB of RAM, only go as far as 3.24GB

other surprises:

  1. The old monitor was 1400x1050 (or something like that). The new one is 1024x768 - hard to adapt to.
  2. The old one ran very hot - 90100C or so. This one is a normal 30-50C max.
  3. Had to reactivate Windows after transplanting the hard drive.
  4. The fingerprint password no longer works - cannot reinitialize or anything like that. The older computer prompted for the fingerprint at boot-up, then would load Windows and take me right in, no need for anything else. After the HD transplant I have to type in the password two times: at boot as well as in Windows.

Will now back up all data and fully encrypt everything.

Yahoo has disclosed a breach of it Yahoo Mail database, prompting users to reset passwords late last week. (via Ydr)
In a notice posted on the Yahoo website, the search engine giant reported “a coordinated effort” to gain access to its email accounts.
"Based on our current findings, the list of usernames and passwords that were used to execute the attack was likely collected from a third-party database compromise," the company says. "We have no evidence that they were obtained directly from Yahoo’s systems.
"Our ongoing investigation shows that malicious computer software used the list of usernames and passwords to access Yahoo Mail accounts. The information sought in the attack seems to be names and email addresses from the affected accounts’ most recent sent emails."
Yahoo said it is resetting passwords on impacted accounts and is using two-factor authentication to allow users to do the reset. Users who were affected will get a prompt to change their passwords, and the company also sent out email and SMS notifications.
"Two-factor authentication has again shown to be an effective barrier to account compromise," Cabetas says. "Any users with two-factor authentication in force wouldn’t have been compromised by this attack campaign. Yahoo has offered two-factor authentication since December 2011."

Yahoo has disclosed a breach of it Yahoo Mail database, prompting users to reset passwords late last week. (via Ydr)

  • "Based on our current findings, the list of usernames and passwords that were used to execute the attack was likely collected from a third-party database compromise," the company says. "We have no evidence that they were obtained directly from Yahoo’s systems.
  • "Our ongoing investigation shows that malicious computer software used the list of usernames and passwords to access Yahoo Mail accounts. The information sought in the attack seems to be names and email addresses from the affected accounts’ most recent sent emails."
  • Yahoo said it is resetting passwords on impacted accounts and is using two-factor authentication to allow users to do the reset. Users who were affected will get a prompt to change their passwords, and the company also sent out email and SMS notifications.
  • "Two-factor authentication has again shown to be an effective barrier to account compromise," Cabetas says. "Any users with two-factor authentication in force wouldn’t have been compromised by this attack campaign. Yahoo has offered two-factor authentication since December 2011."
Police need to have a special wiretap warrant to access a suspect’s daily batch of text messages from their wireless provider, the Supreme Court of Canada decided Wednesday, in its latest ruling on privacy protection in the age of cellphones and digital communication. The ruling recognized that text messages are a type of private electronic communication, so police need to meet a higher standard when seeking a judge’s permission to access them than simply asking for a routine search warrant. (via What powers do police have for online surveillance? - Technology & Science - CBC News)
The case worked its way up to Canada’s top court as wireless provider Telus Corp., which opts to keep a database of text messages within its network for 30 days, argued it should not have to hand over clients’ text messaging logs daily when police ask for them using a general search warrant.
Telus based its case on the argument that seizing the messages would be an “interception,” which would require a wiretap warrant.
Wiretap warrants are more difficult for police to obtain than general search warrants because private communications are afforded special privacy provisions in the Criminal Code. The decision affirms that there is no practical difference between texting and a traditional phone conversation, which would also require a wiretap warrant to be intercepted.
Canadian law allows the police to legally intercept Canadians’ private communications without their knowledge or consent only through an intercept authorization warrant, said Abby Deshman, the director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association public safety program.
Typically, police can apply for three types of warrants: a standard search warrant (which can include searching a computer and printing out data), a production order (which compels someone to hand over information stored in a physical space or on an electronic device) or a general warrant (which can be a little more wide-ranging).
In February, federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson introduced a new bill, C-55, which would give police the right to intercept private communications without a warrant in emergency situations, like immediate harm to an individual or national security.
Police powers were also expanded last month when the Court of Appeal for Ontario ruled that officers have the right to search a person’s phone — as long as it is not password protected.

But if police want to intercept a private communication they must apply for a wiretap authorization and meet a higher standard, including:
having tried other investigative procedures;
demonstrating that other investigative procedures have failed or are likely to fail;
showing the urgency of the case makes it impractical to use only other investigative procedures.
If granted, interceptions are time-limited, and the person whose communication was intercepted will eventually be notified.

Police need to have a special wiretap warrant to access a suspect’s daily batch of text messages from their wireless provider, the Supreme Court of Canada decided Wednesday, in its latest ruling on privacy protection in the age of cellphones and digital communication. The ruling recognized that text messages are a type of private electronic communication, so police need to meet a higher standard when seeking a judge’s permission to access them than simply asking for a routine search warrant. (via What powers do police have for online surveillance? - Technology & Science - CBC News)

  • The case worked its way up to Canada’s top court as wireless provider Telus Corp., which opts to keep a database of text messages within its network for 30 days, argued it should not have to hand over clients’ text messaging logs daily when police ask for them using a general search warrant.
  • Telus based its case on the argument that seizing the messages would be an “interception,” which would require a wiretap warrant.
  • Wiretap warrants are more difficult for police to obtain than general search warrants because private communications are afforded special privacy provisions in the Criminal Code. The decision affirms that there is no practical difference between texting and a traditional phone conversation, which would also require a wiretap warrant to be intercepted.
  • Canadian law allows the police to legally intercept Canadians’ private communications without their knowledge or consent only through an intercept authorization warrant, said Abby Deshman, the director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association public safety program.
  • Typically, police can apply for three types of warrants: a standard search warrant (which can include searching a computer and printing out data), a production order (which compels someone to hand over information stored in a physical space or on an electronic device) or a general warrant (which can be a little more wide-ranging).
  • In February, federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson introduced a new bill, C-55, which would give police the right to intercept private communications without a warrant in emergency situations, like immediate harm to an individual or national security.
  • Police powers were also expanded last month when the Court of Appeal for Ontario ruled that officers have the right to search a person’s phone — as long as it is not password protected.

But if police want to intercept a private communication they must apply for a wiretap authorization and meet a higher standard, including:

  • having tried other investigative procedures;
  • demonstrating that other investigative procedures have failed or are likely to fail;
  • showing the urgency of the case makes it impractical to use only other investigative procedures.

If granted, interceptions are time-limited, and the person whose communication was intercepted will eventually be notified.