The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

Can’t eat poison without dying? Maybe your gut microbes are to blame. Rodents in the Mojave Desert have evolved to eat toxic creosote bushes with the help of specialized gut bacteria. Although scientists had long suspected that bacteria might be key to the rats’ power, they proved it by feeding the rodents antibiotics and ground-up feces. (via Poop Transplants Let Pack Rats Eat Poison - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com)

Can’t eat poison without dying? Maybe your gut microbes are to blame. Rodents in the Mojave Desert have evolved to eat toxic creosote bushes with the help of specialized gut bacteria. Although scientists had long suspected that bacteria might be key to the rats’ power, they proved it by feeding the rodents antibiotics and ground-up feces. (via Poop Transplants Let Pack Rats Eat Poison - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com)

A model from the Sex museum, Paris. ‘Vaginas seem dark and mysterious, and produce strange liquids. Its secretions form the basis of the belief that women are unclean, indeed ritually so.’ Photograph: Sipa Press/Rex Features (via A poisoned vagina? What an intriguing yet stupid murder weapon | Naomi McAuliffe | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk)
Women using poison to murder their husbands is an old trope – one going back as far as Claudius’s poisoning, which implicated his wife Agrippina. “Arsenic Annie” Nannie Doss saw off four husbands, as well as most of her family, in the span of four decades (she confessed to the murders in 1954). And now a Brazilian woman may soon be added to this pantheon of gloom. Although this alleged attempted homicide was unsuccessful, the method will certainly go down in history: she allegedly put poison in her vagina, and invited her husband to perform oral sex on her. The man became suspicious while down south, surprised by an “unusual smell”. He took her to hospital, where the poison was found.
Paranoid fantasies about ladies’ bits are nothing new. Vaginas seem dark and mysterious, and produce strange liquids. Its secretions form the basis of the belief that women are unclean, indeed ritually so. As the South Park character Mr Mackey said: “I just don’t trust anything that bleeds for five days and doesn’t die.” And yet pleasure – and most importantly life – also emanate from it.
This “dark power” inspired folklore. It was believed at various points in history that menstrual blood was semen “gone bad”, that women took men’s life-force through their vaginas, that the female orgasm should be prescribed for anxiety disorders, and that some vaginas came laced with teeth that could castrate a man. Indeed, the myth of the vagina dentata – meaning toothed vagina – can be found in many different cultures, from Greek mythology to the Chaco and Guiana tribes of South America. Its message can be subtly different, depending on where it originated from: it either says that penetrative sex is dangerous, that women are evil temptresses bent on male castration, or that men should not rape women, or suffer the consequences.
This latter threat was actually realised with the invention of Rape-aXe, an anti-rape female condom invented by Sonnet Ehlers in South Africa in 2005. The Rape-aXe is a latex sheath embedded with sharp, inward-facing barbs that would dig into the attacker’s penis, causing excruciating pain.
The article also states that “women are also not more likely to be a poisoner than men: the overwhelming number of convicted poisoners are men” but this could be because society (and mostly chivalrous male judges) tend to be more lenient with female crime.

A model from the Sex museum, Paris. ‘Vaginas seem dark and mysterious, and produce strange liquids. Its secretions form the basis of the belief that women are unclean, indeed ritually so.’ Photograph: Sipa Press/Rex Features (via A poisoned vagina? What an intriguing yet stupid murder weapon | Naomi McAuliffe | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk)

  • Women using poison to murder their husbands is an old trope – one going back as far as Claudius’s poisoning, which implicated his wife Agrippina. “Arsenic Annie” Nannie Doss saw off four husbands, as well as most of her family, in the span of four decades (she confessed to the murders in 1954). And now a Brazilian woman may soon be added to this pantheon of gloom. Although this alleged attempted homicide was unsuccessful, the method will certainly go down in history: she allegedly put poison in her vagina, and invited her husband to perform oral sex on her. The man became suspicious while down south, surprised by an “unusual smell”. He took her to hospital, where the poison was found.
  • Paranoid fantasies about ladies’ bits are nothing new. Vaginas seem dark and mysterious, and produce strange liquids. Its secretions form the basis of the belief that women are unclean, indeed ritually so. As the South Park character Mr Mackey said: “I just don’t trust anything that bleeds for five days and doesn’t die.” And yet pleasure – and most importantly life – also emanate from it.
  • This “dark power” inspired folklore. It was believed at various points in history that menstrual blood was semen “gone bad”, that women took men’s life-force through their vaginas, that the female orgasm should be prescribed for anxiety disorders, and that some vaginas came laced with teeth that could castrate a man. Indeed, the myth of the vagina dentata – meaning toothed vagina – can be found in many different cultures, from Greek mythology to the Chaco and Guiana tribes of South America. Its message can be subtly different, depending on where it originated from: it either says that penetrative sex is dangerous, that women are evil temptresses bent on male castration, or that men should not rape women, or suffer the consequences.
  • This latter threat was actually realised with the invention of Rape-aXe, an anti-rape female condom invented by Sonnet Ehlers in South Africa in 2005. The Rape-aXe is a latex sheath embedded with sharp, inward-facing barbs that would dig into the attacker’s penis, causing excruciating pain.
The article also states that “women are also not more likely to be a poisoner than men: the overwhelming number of convicted poisoners are men” but this could be because society (and mostly chivalrous male judges) tend to be more lenient with female crime.
According to court records, in 2008, Scotts distributed 73 million packages of bird seed coated with the insecticides Storcide II, containing the active ingredient chlorpyrifos, and and Actellic 5E, containing the active ingredient pirimiphos-methyl, intended to keep insects from destroying the seed. The company continued to produce and market the insecticide-coated seeds despite being alerted to toxicity dangers by a Scotts staff chemist and ornithologist. (via Grist)
In addition to the bird seed, Scotts is in big trouble for selling chemical-loaded gardening products without first obtaining registration from the EPA. The federal government alleges that a Scotts manager even went so far as to fabricate documents and correspondence with the agency. It seems they find forgery easier than just not poisoning wildlife.
The judge hasn’t decided what, exactly, Scotts’ punishment will be yet, but the company has proposed paying a $4 million fine and donating $500,000 towards wildlife conservation. Maybe all the house finches, sparrows, and mourning doves Scotts has poisoned over the years will file a class-action lawsuit and push for a lot more than that.

According to court records, in 2008, Scotts distributed 73 million packages of bird seed coated with the insecticides Storcide II, containing the active ingredient chlorpyrifos, and and Actellic 5E, containing the active ingredient pirimiphos-methyl, intended to keep insects from destroying the seed. The company continued to produce and market the insecticide-coated seeds despite being alerted to toxicity dangers by a Scotts staff chemist and ornithologist. (via Grist)

  • In addition to the bird seed, Scotts is in big trouble for selling chemical-loaded gardening products without first obtaining registration from the EPA. The federal government alleges that a Scotts manager even went so far as to fabricate documents and correspondence with the agency. It seems they find forgery easier than just not poisoning wildlife.
  • The judge hasn’t decided what, exactly, Scotts’ punishment will be yet, but the company has proposed paying a $4 million fine and donating $500,000 towards wildlife conservation. Maybe all the house finches, sparrows, and mourning doves Scotts has poisoned over the years will file a class-action lawsuit and push for a lot more than that.