The Indelible Bonobo Experience

Renaissance Monkey: in-depth expertise in Jack-of-all-trading. I mostly comment on news of interest to me and occasionally engage in debates or troll passive-aggressively. Ask or Submit 2 mah authoritah! ;) !

After three U.S. siblings had what they believed to be an authentic Auguste Rodin sculpture appraised and were told it was a fake worth a measly $1,500, the trio took the piece elsewhere — and were dealt much more favourable news. According to Matt Quinn of Quinn’s Auction Gallery in Falls Church, N.Y., the piece is a genuine Rodin called “Le Desespoir” that the three siblings could sell for up to $135,000 when it goes up for auction on Saturday. (via Siblings told ‘creepy’ statue that once sat beside gerbil cage an authentic Rodin worth up to $135K | National Post)

After three U.S. siblings had what they believed to be an authentic Auguste Rodin sculpture appraised and were told it was a fake worth a measly $1,500, the trio took the piece elsewhere — and were dealt much more favourable news. According to Matt Quinn of Quinn’s Auction Gallery in Falls Church, N.Y., the piece is a genuine Rodin called “Le Desespoir” that the three siblings could sell for up to $135,000 when it goes up for auction on Saturday. (via Siblings told ‘creepy’ statue that once sat beside gerbil cage an authentic Rodin worth up to $135K | National Post)

The King of Kensington has been given a new wardrobe for the summer, and not all of his subjects are happy about it.
A life-sized bronze sculpture of Toronto-born actor and director Al Waxman has been vandalized, getting elaborately painted with a blue shirt, neon green jacket, and white face and hands. An unknown symbol was also painted in the centre of his forehead. The statue — which now bears a distinct resemblance to Batman’s archenemy The Joker — sits in Bellevue Square Park, in the heart of Kensington Market. (via King of Kensington Al Waxman’s statue gets unwanted makeover | Toronto Star)

“Do I take it personally? No not at all,” said Abernethy. “(My pieces) are created for public space and they are created to be shared — there is no greater purpose for them. And however that plays out in a community is part of the narrative.”

Michael Viglione owner of Kid Icarus — a screen print studio shop located near Bellevue Square Park — doesn’t necessarily think that vandalism in the neighbourhood is a bad thing.
“Vandalism in general is an issue, but in terms of Kensington Market, a bit is tolerable,” said Viglione. “There is an anarchist undertone — it’s a part of the neighbourhood.”
Ryan Rubin works at Longboard Living, an Augusta Ave. store. He says there is a difference between vandalism and street art in the Kensington Market neighbourhood.
“Ninety per cent of the time street art is tolerated and accepted,” said Rubin. “But spray painting a statue of someone who helped the neighbourhood in the past — that seems a bit disrespectful.”
Waxman, a veteran actor, was perhaps best known for his role on the television show King of Kensington.

The King of Kensington has been given a new wardrobe for the summer, and not all of his subjects are happy about it.
A life-sized bronze sculpture of Toronto-born actor and director Al Waxman has been vandalized, getting elaborately painted with a blue shirt, neon green jacket, and white face and hands. An unknown symbol was also painted in the centre of his forehead. The statue — which now bears a distinct resemblance to Batman’s archenemy The Joker — sits in Bellevue Square Park, in the heart of Kensington Market. (via King of Kensington Al Waxman’s statue gets unwanted makeover | Toronto Star)

“Do I take it personally? No not at all,” said Abernethy. “(My pieces) are created for public space and they are created to be shared — there is no greater purpose for them. And however that plays out in a community is part of the narrative.”

Michael Viglione owner of Kid Icarus — a screen print studio shop located near Bellevue Square Park — doesn’t necessarily think that vandalism in the neighbourhood is a bad thing.
“Vandalism in general is an issue, but in terms of Kensington Market, a bit is tolerable,” said Viglione. “There is an anarchist undertone — it’s a part of the neighbourhood.”
Ryan Rubin works at Longboard Living, an Augusta Ave. store. He says there is a difference between vandalism and street art in the Kensington Market neighbourhood.
“Ninety per cent of the time street art is tolerated and accepted,” said Rubin. “But spray painting a statue of someone who helped the neighbourhood in the past — that seems a bit disrespectful.”
Waxman, a veteran actor, was perhaps best known for his role on the television show King of Kensington.

"I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying.”
Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini, Ecstasy of St Theresa, 1652 (Marble) (via BBC - BBC TWO - Simon Schama’s: Power of Art)

"I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying.

Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini, Ecstasy of St Theresa, 1652 (Marble) (via BBC - BBC TWO - Simon Schama’s: Power of Art)